Safe Mode: On
R.I.P. Rosie The Riveter

From the BBC
Woman who inspired iconic US WWII poster dies
A US female factory worker who inspired the Rosie the Riveter poster during World War II has died at the age of 86.

The image of Geraldine Doyle and the “We Can Do It!” message was commissioned to boost morale for women working in manufacturing at the time.

Doyle was photographed wearing a red and white polka-dot bandana at a metal factory in Michigan at the age of 17.

She died on Sunday in the city of Lansing after suffering complications from arthritis, a spokesperson said.

The image featuring Doyle flexing her bicep beneath a rolled-up shirt sleeve helped to prompt women in the US to take positions in manufacturing and replace male workers serving in the military.

The image can often be found today on postage stamps, T-shirts, coffee mugs and aprons.

Doyle reportedly did not realise she was the inspiration for the Rosie character, which became an icon of the feminist movement in the US, until she spotted the image in a magazine article in 1982.

“It was great for her when she finally learned about it,” Doyle’s daughter, Stephanie Gregg, told the Associated Press news agency.

Doyle is said to have left her position at the factory two weeks after the photograph was taken when she learned another worker injured her hand performing the same job.


Click to view image: '63d357d6561b-_50626610_50626609.jpg'

Added: Jan-1-2011 Occurred On: Dec-31-2010
By: star53
In:
News
Tags: Rosie The Riveter, icon, WWII, RIP
Views: 6546 | Comments: 12 | Votes: 1 | Favorites: 0 | Shared: 0 | Updates: 0 | Times used in channels: 1
You need to be registered in order to add comments! Register HERE
Sort by: Newest first | Oldest first | Highest score first
Liveleak opposes racial slurs - if you do spot comments that fall into this category, please report them for us to review.
  • Being pedantic, she wasn't "Rosie the Riveter", she was the "We Can do it" girl. Rosie the Riveter was a totally different subject(s) by other women.

    The poster was made from an 'iconic' photograph. If anyone has links to the original photograph, please post it.

    Posted Jan-1-2011 By 

    (2) | Report

    • Comment of user 'bouymarker' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
    • Taka taka taka...

      "Doyle was photographed wearing a red and white polka-dot bandana at a metal factory in Michigan at the age of 17."

      All the images you linked are post the fact. No problem as that's all I can find as well.

      That the original is said to be in color is a problem... perhaps 'unlikely'. That there is no image anyone can find is more of a problem. Perhaps some big news organisation can help?

      Posted Jan-1-2011 By 

      (1) | Report

  • such an iconic poster R.I.P

    Posted Jan-1-2011 By 

    (1) | Report

  • Here is another bit of ww2 trivia.

    The words "KILROY WAS HERE" showed up all over the world in grafitti everywhere. Nobody seemed to know where it came from for a long time.

    Kilroy was a guy who counted rivits in a shipyard, in the hulls of ships, going off two war.
    There was cheating going on as to who did the riviting, and who got paid for it.

    Kilroy counted them and signed his hame.

    The war was pressing and the hulls of the ships did'nt get painted untill they were in s More..

    Posted Jan-1-2011 By 

    (1) | Report

    • Very interesting! That sheds new light on why soldiers in the field would write it on walls and such as the battle moved across Europe.
      It's a very distinct "We're done here."

      Posted Jan-1-2011 By 

      (0) | Report

  • ww2 was the best thing that ever happened to the US economy

    Posted Jan-1-2011 By 

    (1) | Report

  • RIP Rosie.

    Posted Jan-1-2011 By 

    (1) | Report

  • r.i.p. she was part of the greatest generation period in my humble opinion.

    Posted Jan-1-2011 By 

    (1) | Report

  • Comment of user 'DEFCON-1' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
    • Comment of user 'DEFCON-1' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
  • Yes, long gone are the days of the hard laboring female worker in the West. How tragic.

    Posted Jan-1-2011 By 

    (-2) | Report