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Texas vs California: A Lesson in Liberal LIes, Ineptitude, and Failure

MARCH 14, 2012 4:00 A.M.

Texas vs. California
Why so many people are moving from the Golden State to the Lone Star State.By Chuck DeVore

One in five Americans calls California or Texas home. The two most populous states have a lot in common: a long coast, a sunny climate, a diverse population, plenty of oil in the ground, and Mexico to the south. Where they diverge is in their governance.

For six years ending in 2010, I represented almost 500,000 people in California’s legislature. I was vice chairman of the Assembly Committee on Revenue and Taxation and served on the Budget Committee. I was even a lieutenant colonel in the state’s National Guard. Before serving in Sacramento, I worked as an executive in California’s aerospace industry.

I moved to Texas late last year, joining the 2 million Californians who have packed up for greener pastures in the past ten years, with Texas the most common destination.

In his State-of-the-State address this January, California governor Jerry Brown said, “Contrary to those declinists who sing of Texas and bemoan our woes, California is still the land of dreams. . . . It’s the place where Apple . . . and countless other creative companies all began.”




Fast forward to March: Apple announced it was building a $304 million campus in Austin with plans to hire 3,600 people to staff it, more than doubling its Texas workforce.

California may be dreaming, but Texas is working.

California’s elected officials are particularly adept at dreaming up ways to spend other people’s money. While the state struggles with interminable deficits caused by years of reckless spending, the argument in Sacramento isn’t over how to reduce government; rather, it’s over how much to raise taxes and on whom. Governor Brown is pushing for a tax increase of $6.9 billion per year, to appear on this November’s ballot. California’s powerful government-employee unions and Molly Munger, a wealthy civil-rights attorney (wealthy by dint of being the daughter of Warren Buffett’s business partner) are offering two competing tax-hike plans. The silver lining may be that having three tax hikes on the ballot will turn voters off all of them.

Meanwhile, lawmakers in Texas are grappling with a fiscal question of an entirely different sort: whether or not to spend some of the $6 billion set aside in the state’s rainy-day fund.

California’s government-employee unions routinely spend tens of millions of dollars at election time to maintain their hold on power. In Texas, the government unions are weak and don’t have collective bargaining, leaving trial attorneys as the main source of funding for Lone Star Democrats.

California’s habit of raising taxes to fund a burgeoning regulatory state isn’t without impact on its economy. Californians fork over about 10.6 percent of their income to state and local governments, above the U.S. average of 9.8 percent. Texans pay 7.9 percent. This affects the bottom line of both consumers and businesses.

With that money, Californians pay for more government. The number of non-education bureaucrats in California is close to the national average, at 252 per 10,000 people. Texas gets by with a bureaucracy 22 percent smaller: 196 per 10,000.

Of course, having more government employees means making more government rules. According to a 2009 study commissioned by the California legislature, state regulations cost almost $500 billion per year, or five times the state’s general-fund budget. These regulations ding the average small business for some $134,122 a year in compliance and opportunity costs.

While California has more bureaucrats, Texas has 17 percent more teachers, with 295 education employees per 10,000 people, compared to California’s 252.

The two states’ educational outcomes reflect this disparity. If we compare national test scores in math, science, and reading for the fourth and eighth grades among four basic ethnic and racial categories — all students, whites, Hispanics, and African-Americans — Texas beats California in every category, and by a substantial margin. In fact, Texas schools perform consistently above the national average across categories of age, race, and subject matter, while California schools perform well below the national average.

Apologists for the Golden State frequently point to Texas’s flourishing oil and gas industry as the reason for its success. Texas does lead the nation in proven oil reserves, but California ranks third. The real difference isn’t in geology but in public policy: Californians have decided to make it difficult to extract the oil under their feet.

Further, contrary to popular opinion, California’s refineries routinely produce a greater value of product than do refineries in Texas, mainly because the special gasoline blends that California requires are more costly.

Another advantage that Texas enjoys over California is in its civil-justice system. In 2002, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce ranked Texas’s legal system 46th in the nation, just behind California’s, which was 45th. Texas went to work improving its lawsuit environment, enacting major medical-malpractice reforms in 2003. Texas’s ranking consequently jumped ten places in eight years, while California’s dropped to 46th. In the last legislative session, Texas lawmakers passed a landmark loser-pays provision, which promises to further curtail frivolous lawsuits.

While California seeks more ways to tax success, it excels at subsidizing poverty. The percentage of households receiving public assistance in California was 3.7 percent in 2009, double Texas’s rate of 1.8 percent. Almost one-third of all Americans on welfare reside in California.

With this in mind, it makes perfect sense that only 18 percent of the Democrats who control both houses of California’s full-time legislature worked in business or medicine before being elected. The remainder drew paychecks from government, worked as community organizers, or were attorneys.

In Texas, with its part-time legislature, 75 percent of the Republicans who control both houses earn a living in business, farming, or medicine, with 19 percent being attorneys in private practice. Texas Democrats are more than twice as likely as their California counterparts to claim private-sector experience outside the field of law.

That Texas’s legislature is run by makers and California’s by takers is glaringly obvious from the two states’ respective balance sheets.

— Chuck DeVore served in the California State Assembly from 2004 to 2010 and was a Republican candidate for the United States Senate in 2010. He is currently a visiting senior fellow in fiscal policy at the Texas Public Policy Foundation.

http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/293412/texas-vs-california-chuck-devore


Added: Mar-19-2012 Occurred On: Mar-19-2012
By: yorba
In:
Politics
Tags: California, bankrupt, Texas, jobs, economy, business, taxes
Location: Dallas, Texas, United States (load item map)
Views: 3824 | Comments: 82 | Votes: 4 | Favorites: 1 | Shared: 0 | Updates: 0 | Times used in channels: 2
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  • Whenever I have been in California I couldn't wait to get out of California.
    The land of fruits and nuts, biggest freak show on the planet.

    Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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  • Comment of user 'landsolo' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
  • I love Texas. Great state to call home.

    Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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  • Here's the problem. Many Californians are following the jobs out of the state, and they'll bring their toxic, clueless libthink with them. That's what happened in AZ in the late '90s, and the result was Janet Napolitano as governor.

    Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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  • Both states are overrun with dumb fucking Mexicans. Give me New Hampshire or Maine, at least there I don't have to pay for private schools.

    Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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  • Poor Texas. Being infected with Californians. Will not be long before texas is a carbon copy of fail.

    Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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  • Caliutopia just got slapped in the face with a Texas whip.

    Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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  • Texas is shit compared to California. I've lived in Dallas, Austin, San Francisco, and San Diego. California is better in every way.

    Posted Mar-20-2012 By 

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  • Don't mess with Texas.

    The chicks in Texas are hot, too. And I'm a Dallas Cowboys season ticket holder. There's a lot to like about Texas but I'm staying in the Golden State.

    Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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  • Stay the fuck home we dont want you...i would rather have more mexicans thanks...

    Posted Mar-20-2012 By 

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  • Great.

    I guess this pissing contest's got a winner for now!

    Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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  • Please, die California, die now and die quick. To prove us all in the country that the lunatic policies of liberals don't get us anywhere.

    Posted Mar-20-2012 By 

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    • @conservative hispanic Yeah, are you including the some two million veterans that live in California? Anyways, you're from one of the biggest shitholes in the entire country.

      Posted May-1-2012 By 

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    • @ghostofjw

      If you're talking about Reno, then let me remind you that people move here from California. Maybe that tells you something. Besides, is not my fault about what is happening in that state. If I had the money I would gladly help those veterans.

      Posted May-2-2012 By 

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    • @conservative hispanic The point I was making is that there are millions of hard working patriotic people in California. So stating that you'd like to see us all die, makes you a brainwashed neo-con.

      And yeah... Reno is just doing fine, right?

      http://weeklyseven.com/latest/2012/04/26/reno-recession-leaves-legacy

      http://realestate.yahoo.com/promo/5-american-cities-nearly-destroyed-by-the-recession.html

      Posted May-2-2012 By 

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    • @ghostofjw

      When I say "die", I'm not talking about you and other Americans actually die, meaning lose your lives. But when you see the policies coming out of your state, then you have to wonder. As for me being a brain-washed neo-con, if that's what you call me for telling the truth, then so be it.

      Posted May-3-2012 By 

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  • I live in Houston and it is amazing how many out of state plate's I have been seeing in the past year. Plate's from all over , but I see more from the east coast 'New York and New Jersey". Most of the people moving from California are moving around the Austin area.

    Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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  • Calixico, Texico...give them states to Mexico, then put up a big wall and see how long before those states turn into a shit hole like Mexico.

    Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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  • Comment of user 'fresnopete' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
  • Buh bye...

    Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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  • I've lived in California for decades, and the state has deteriorated as the percentage of Democrats has increased.
    They used to be tax-and-spend Democrats.
    Now they're spend-and-tax Democrats.
    Pray that the malignancy that is California does not metastasize to your state.

    Posted Mar-20-2012 By 

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  • Just throwing it out there rick perry is the govenor of texas. I mean he has done a good job. To bad he wasnt good a debating.

    Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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    • @ALEWAR0311 - Yeah, he did a great job of going against the constitution and mandating Gardasil. You can keep him. If it was not for oil, Texas would be a dust bowl.

      Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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    • Comment of user 'IIVXTII' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
    • @IIVXTII - Perry may have done some good and may do more good in the future...but he sold out to big pharma. Texas is a fine state except it's proximity to Mexico. However it is infested with illegals and the only thing keeping the state from falling in the abyss is oil.

      Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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    • Comment of user 'IIVXTII' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
    • @IIVXTII - Oil money allows Texas to be somewhat diversified. If you take away oil, it would be a house of cards falling.

      Posted Mar-21-2012 By 

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  • Comment of user 'firetatoo' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
    • @firetatoo Explain this rule and how it applies. The stae legislature has been utterly dominated by Democrats for nearly 40 years now.

      Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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    • @yorba 20 to 12 Republitard advantage in the state senate.
      101 to 49 Republitard advantage in the house.
      Not to mention the moron governor.

      "dominated by Democrats".......what a maroon!!!!!!!!!!!

      Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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    • Comment of user 'firetatoo' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
    • Comment of user 'firetatoo' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
    • @cdlcrash What the fuck state are you looking at, fool? Democrats hold a 52-28 advantage in the 80 seat Assembly, and a 25-15 advantage in the 40 seat State Senate. And they control the State Board of Equalization 3-2. You don't even have the right damn # of seats or the right terminology, monkey man. We don't have a "house", it's an Assembly. Dumb fuck.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Democratic_Party

      Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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  • What this report is neglecting to say is that a vast majority of those moving to Texas are retirees. And why not? Sell your decent sized house in a California suburb and buy a sprawling mansion in TX. As for younger professionals, most would be looking at a pay cut.

    Median household income
    CA $60,882
    TX $49,646

    Poverty rate
    CA 13.7%
    TX 16.8%

    College graduates
    CA 30.1%
    TX 25.8%

    We're even more patriotic. Number of veterans...
    CA 2,051,959
    TX 1,635,367

    Now I'm not denying that we don't have More..

    Posted Mar-19-2012 By 

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    • @ghostofjw thumbs down for supplying facts, lol. Nerd!

      Posted Mar-20-2012 By 

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    • @xenocidal *In my best southern accent*

      Well, you can't trust what those Socialist, Marxist, Leninist, Communist at the US Census Bureau say... especially when it doesn't support my radical rightwing rhetoric.

      Posted Mar-20-2012 By 

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    • @ghostofjw Your first stat is flawed. You have to take the cost of living into accound. Texas ranks 2nd in preferred cost of living. California is at the bottom of the list. There's an online calculator you can use to calculate the cost of living difference. If you make approximately $46,000.00 per year in Austin, TX you'd have to make approximately $78,000.00 per year in San Fransisco to make even. I chose those two cities because their fairly close in population. The National Center for Ve More..

      Posted Apr-17-2012 By 

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    • @ghostofjw Are you suggesting that all southerners are rightwing radicals? This is like the pot calling the kettle black. There are just as many left wing radicals. This left vs. right issue is nonsense. It's an argument fabricated by the two parties to keep us divided so that they can maintain control. As long as we're bickering with each other then they can strip us of our rights, tax us to death, and spend our money (and then some). We need to quit thinking of ourselves as Democrats and R More..

      Posted Apr-17-2012 By 

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