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The Last Days of Cheap Chinese-Why American consumers are about to start paying more for clothes, el

By Alexandra Harney
Posted Tuesday, April 8, 2008, at 7:33 AM ET

Workers assembling toys on a production line in Shantou, China. Click image to expand.Workers assembling toys on a production line in Shantou, China

For years, American importers and Chinese factory managers have been having the same conversation. The importers would demand lower prices for products destined for American shelves. Factory managers would counter with a long list of reasons why they needed to charge more. Most of the time, the American importers would prevail, and Wal-Mart shoppers would rejoice.

Not anymore. The era of cheap Chinese consumer goods may finally be ending, thanks to irrepressible inflation. Now when the Chinese present their lists, some American importers are conceding higher prices, meaning that American shoppers, for the first time in years, are starting to pick up the tab for rising costs in China. Some Chinese factories are now asking their American customers for price increases of as much as 20 percent to 30 percent.

A store manager at a young women's clothing store in Boston tells me the prices of some camisoles are rising. An executive in the athletic shoe industry says that Chinese factories and buyers are now negotiating about spring 2009 shoe lines, and that is where consumers will really start to see the impact of Chinese inflation. A manager of several discount stores confides his company has started raising prices of certain goods while putting others on sale. This is only the beginning: We'll be paying higher prices for Chinese goods for years to come.

Consumers of Chinese exports (read: you and I) have for the past two decades benefited from an extraordinary confluence of factors. China's desire to attract foreign investment, rural workers' hunger for higher wages than they could earn on the farm, and excess capacity in nearly every industry helped limit price increases for Chinese exports. The renminbi was undervalued, wages were low, raw materials were cheap, and government officials turned a blind eye to factories' labor and environmental violations.

But now a perfect storm has hit China's manufacturers. So far this year, the renminbi has been appreciating at a 16 percent annualized rate. And prices for raw materials, which account for 60 percent to 70 percent of manufacturers' costs, are soaring. Hundred-dollar-a-barrel oil has raised transport costs and the price of oil-related materials such as plastics. Although some economists expect raw material prices to weaken in the second half of this year, in the long term, the emergence of millions of new car drivers, home buyers, and office workers in India and China will keep the price of steel, plastic, and other raw materials high.

At the same time, China is rolling out wage increases around the country and tightening its labor laws. Wages are rising at double-digit rates in coastal China. In January, Beijing introduced a new labor law that significantly strengthened the influence of the union in management decisions. The All-China Federation of Trade Unions, the country's state-backed labor organization, has launched an aggressive recruiting campaign. Beijing hopes that better protection for workers through the union and the new labor law will placate its increasingly restive manufacturing workforce. But a tidal shift in the country's demographics—a dwindling supply of young workers as a result of the "one child" policy in effect since 1979—will counteract Beijing's efforts.

China's Generation Y, the children born after the one-child policy came into effect, are increasingly aware of their rights to a legal wage, health insurance, and a certain number of days off every month. Their demands for better treatment will continue to drive up the cost of manufacturing in China. Already, southern China's Guangdong province, known as "the workshop of the world," is short 2 million workers, the equivalent of 14 percent of America's entire manufacturing workforce.

The problem for American retailers and consumers hooked on $3 T-shirts and $30 DVD players is that there is no other China waiting in the wings to make cheap goods reliably for American shoppers. American importers are now arriving by the planeload in Vietnam, hoping to take advantage of the country's lower wages. But Vietnam, hard as it tries, has only 85 million people—the size of one Chinese province. And only a fraction of its population is suitable for factory work. Moreover, prices are rising faster in Vietnam than anywhere else in Asia. Add in the rising incidence of strikes and labor disputes, and Vietnam looks increasingly like a short-term alternative.

India, the other country often mentioned as a China surrogate, has not yet managed to get its act together to take advantage of China's rising export prices. Importers say India is good at certain things—embroidery, for instance—but not at the volume production that the world depends on for cheap goods. India's road and port infrastructure, while improving, is nowhere near as efficient as China's.

So importers are looking back to countries they once rejected in favor of China—Indonesia, Mexico, and Malaysia. And they are looking ahead to countries not yet integrated into the global consumer-goods supply chain, such as Brazil and Kenya. Every country, however, offers its own special risks: strong labor unions in one, political instability in another. None offers the one-stop shop appeal of China, where factories make everything under the sun. For the time being, then, we will all still be buying a lot of "Made in China" products—and paying ever more for them.


My opinion:

I hope everyone is happy. The wage gap between the Developed and Developing world is shrinking fast. In a few decades the world will reach equilibrium, and a new paradigm in international trade will be born. I think it is most likely to lead to local production on demand. No more mass anything, that has to be transported thousands of miles. I guess we will have gone full circle. Will pay higher prices until the technology becomes mature.

The power of Market Economics is amazing. Some fear, some loathe, some praise, but it is relentless.

(I can hear the NWO/Jewish/NAU conspiracies already)


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Added: Apr-10-2008 
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  • what will wal-mart shoppers do without thier cheap crap they don't need?

    Posted Apr-10-2008 By 

    (3) | Report

  • Oh noes!! Ill have to pay a bit more money for goods that wont poison my pets and children! what are we to do ............I hope china drowns in shark fin soup while being poisoned by lead based painted ceramic bowls.

    Posted Apr-10-2008 By 

    (2) | Report

  • Hitler_Is_Amazing: "Oh well guess a pair of pliers from the USA will cost me $6 instead of $5 for the china junk ones. Why should we be supporting these chinamen anyway who we are going to be fighting WW3 with sooner or later?"
    Who is stopping you know to buy those US made pliers. The reality is that most people would rather pay a dollar less if possible. The problem is that made in US pliers will cost you $10 instead of $6. The way American economy is going and the way greenback is More..

    Posted Apr-11-2008 By 

    (1) | Report

  • Epitope: "
    anurag_kati: "
    Hitler_Is_Amazing: "Oh well guess a pair of pliers from the USA will cost me $6 instead of $5 for the china junk ones. Why should we be supporting these chinamen anyway who we are going to be fighting WW3 with sooner or later?"
    Who is stopping you know to buy those US made pliers. The reality is that most people would rather pay a dollar less if possible. The problem is that made in US pliers will cost you $10 instead of $6. The way American economy More..
    domestic prices are still pretty stable. It's just the exchange rate that is messing with us. I hope domestic prices don't get out of control in the near future."

    One of my friends is a retail manager in Ohio and he told me today that they were cutting out entire sections of the stores because sales are so bad.

    We've already seen a 25% increase in shelf prices on a good number of food products, the worst is yet to come.

    Posted Apr-11-2008 By 

    (1) | Report

  • MolochLives: "
    Epitope: "
    anurag_kati: "
    Hitler_Is_Amazing: "Oh well guess a pair of pliers from the USA will cost me $6 instead of $5 for the china junk ones. Why should we be supporting these chinamen anyway who we are going to be fighting WW3 with sooner or later?"
    Who is stopping you know to buy those US made pliers. The reality is that most people would rather pay a dollar less if possible. The problem is that made in US pliers will cost you $10 instead of $6. The wa More..
    domestic prices are still pretty stable. It's just the exchange rate that is messing with us. I hope domestic prices don't get out of control in the near future."

    One of my friends is a retail manager in Ohio and he told me today that they were cutting out entire sections of the stores because sales are so bad.

    We've already seen a 25% increase in shelf prices on a good number of food products, the worst is yet to come.

    "
    Very true, Stores all over America are seeing a drop in sales. I actually heard construction of new big chain stores are being put on hold for right now. Like you said the way prices are jumping who knows how bad it will get.

    Posted Apr-11-2008 By 

    (1) | Report

  • It's a marriage of convenience. We buy their crap and help them employ their restive population and they buy our debt (600 billion in debt alone) and help keep us from printing money to get by. But the marriage won't last forever

    Posted Apr-10-2008 By 

    (0) | Report

  • atman100: "It's a marriage of convenience. We buy their crap and help them employ their restive population and they buy our debt (600 billion in debt alone) and help keep us from printing money to get by. But the marriage won't last forever"


    If were married to china, I'd rather we just f^*ked
    ourselves.

    Posted Apr-11-2008 By 

    (0) | Report

  • anurag_kati: "
    Hitler_Is_Amazing: "Oh well guess a pair of pliers from the USA will cost me $6 instead of $5 for the china junk ones. Why should we be supporting these chinamen anyway who we are going to be fighting WW3 with sooner or later?"
    Who is stopping you know to buy those US made pliers. The reality is that most people would rather pay a dollar less if possible. The problem is that made in US pliers will cost you $10 instead of $6. The way American economy is going and th More..
    domestic prices are still pretty stable. It's just the exchange rate that is messing with us. I hope domestic prices don't get out of control in the near future.

    Posted Apr-11-2008 By 

    (0) | Report

  • Comment of user 'viperfoxbat' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
  • Listen up yanks , if you use your heads america will do well out of this , everyone knows everything that comes out of china is utter crap and if its expensive crap no one is going to want it , dont you think its time to start manufactring stuff in america again, let get everyone back into work and making stuff, bringing jobs a and finacial security back. and before long you can sell your crap back to china and get your dollars back .

    Posted Apr-11-2008 By 

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  • Oh well guess a pair of pliers from the USA will cost me $6 instead of $5 for the china junk ones. Why should we be supporting these chinamen anyway who we are going to be fighting WW3 with sooner or later?

    Posted Apr-10-2008 By 

    (-1) | Report

  • Yes, dog hair is going though the roof and the kidneys of prisoners went up 30% last month.

    Posted Apr-10-2008 By 

    (-1) | Report