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How Rudy Giuliani cleaned up NYC City with conservative practices

NY POST, 5/15/12 -- When I first ran for mayor in 1989, I lost the race. I realized afterward that if I wanted to run again and win, I needed the equivalent of a graduate degree in how to turn around one of the world’s largest cities. I began to meet with experts in all areas.


Retaking the streets: Cracking down on the squeegee guys, who molested motorists, was an idea that came out of James Q. Wilson’s theory.

I was especially interested in law enforcement. I had grown up with police officers and pored over issues of Spring 3100, the New York City Police Department’s in-house magazine, as a child. In the years since, I’d noticed that police officers had become better equipped and better trained and were solving crimes more intelligently than ever before. So why wouldn’t the crime rate drop?

New York tried adding more beat cops and running social programs to keep youth out of gangs; none of these steps dented the increasingly appalling crime statistics in a very dangerous Big Apple.

In the early days of Rudy University, we met with George Kelling, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, who, with James Q. Wilson, had written an article called “Broken Windows” in March 1982 in The Atlantic Monthly. I’d worked closely with Wilson in 1981, when he was cochair of the Task Force on Violent Crime and I was the associate attorney general.

In New York during the 1980s and 1990s, local government seemed to have conceded defeat. The city would actually put stickers of plants and venetian blinds in the windows of abandoned buildings to disguise the decay. But Wilson had a revelation about crime: Focus on the small crimes, such as littering, and keep neighborhoods clean and free of signs of disorder, such as broken windows. The big idea was: If the neighborhood looks as if someone is watching and maintaining order, it’s far more likely that order will prevail.

A clean and well-ordered neighborhood sends a signal to criminals and citizens alike. Instead of putting up stickers to hide the decay, Wilson’s theory said that you should remove the decay — and that this would save the neighborhood.

Wilson’s idea reversed the conventional wisdom up to that point. The dominant liberal theories told us that if we provided more social services to the poor, perhaps crime would get better. But Wilson suggested that, instead, we turn our attention to providing a better and cleaner place to live, raising the expectations of the community by improving the quality of life — and that then crime would decline.

When I became mayor in 1993, I couldn’t wait to test Wilson’s theory. I began, with Police Commissioner Bill Bratton, to focus on the squeegee guys, who disturbed and frightened visitors to the city, wiping down their windshields and demanding payment. We moved them off the streets, and there was an immediate feeling that low-level criminals were no longer in control and that New York City was livable again.

We also decided to use Deputy Police Commissioner Jack Maple’s CompStat, a system that could detect patterns in crime. This allowed us to implement Broken Windows theory.

Beat policing hadn’t been working because the beats had become predictable. With CompStat, we could review each night’s data the next morning and deploy police officers accordingly. We knew from day to day exactly what was happening where in the city, and we stopped more crimes from occurring. We learned to stop a crime wave before it began to affect the quality of life in a community noticeably.

New York City’s decrease in crime is already legendary, and similar drops have occurred in many cities, thanks to Wilson’s theory. Los Angeles, Austin and Philadelphia, to name a few, use CompStat. Harvard University did a major study of the Broken Windows theory in Lowell, Mass., in 2005, and concluded that it worked.

The loss of James Q. Wilson this year is a loss to us all. He was that rare academic whose ideas could be put into action and improve the quality of life. His Broken Windows theory changed the face of modern policing. Wilson’s ideas have been borne out by studies and are now taught in universities. The greatest evidence of his success surrounds us — a resurgent city and thousands of New Yorkers who are alive today because of his radical solution to a tidal wave of crime.

Rudolph W. Giuliani was New York City mayor from 1994-2001. Adapted from City Journal.


SOURCE: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/opedcolumnists/saving_broken_city_ktuDrZuvfrbVd3yw1UWiGJ


Added: May-16-2012 
By: gorgonzatropolis
In:
Regional News, Other News, Other
Tags: crime, conservative, giuliani, new york city, NYC
Location: New York, New York, United States (load item map)
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  • I've always been a fan of Giuliani...He would have made a GREAT President!

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  • I remember people literally lining up in the street for heroin and rows of abandoned buildings before Giuliani started cracking down. Go Rudy.

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    • @gorgonzatropolis

      Yeah Now the crack is gone replaced by bankers and a bunch of other idiots who price out the middle class and poor from living in the city......Thanks to them many had to move away

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    • Comment of user 'The Grim' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
    • @The Grim

      Yeah I hear ya.....no way the drugs and crime that came can stay away. Its just that folks only remember Giuliani for his fight on crime but he was a real hard ass on really mundane things like sitting on a milk crate, playing cards on the street, sitting on the stairs in the subway, park curfews, etc. The cops would really only enforce such issues in the outer bouroughs never in the areas where rich folks were. The NYC you see today is a shell of it former self and wil never be th More..

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  • Like all good blokes Rudy suffered the tall poppy syndrome.

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  • I can agree. Giuliani really did clean up New York. Before him was Mayor Dinkins who did absolutely nothing in regards to crime. I believe that most of the crime done in the big apple was around the time Dinkins was Mayor. Alot of racial crimes were commited. Blacks and whites and Blacks and Jews were at each others throats. It was a rough time i kid you not. As for Giuliani, he did a great job being mayor. Although i lost alot of respect for him while he was running for President by constantly More..

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  • I don't agree with some of his political ideas, but I have to take my hat off to him. He definetely changed New York.

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  • There's no doubt that crime droped significantly under Giuliani, but he was a staunch supporter of gun-control. He seemed to favor a police state over law abiding citizens having a means to defend themselves.

    He also supported illegals having a "right" to a taxpayer funded education and public services while at the same time cracking down heavily on non-violent marijuana users.

    One more thing, he supported publically funded abortions while mayor before flip flopping during the pres More..

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    • @The Grim

      Is New York City not part of the US? Where in the 2nd Amendment does it say that major cities are exampt? There are plenty of guns still around, only the criminals have them. Pointing to reduced crime rates to justify unconstitutional laws is unacceptable. A free society has it's inherant risks, but I'll take freedom over security any day.

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    • @The Grim

      Yeah sure, you only have to jump though hoops, pay hundreds of dollars in revenue collection, wait up to 24 months, and hope that a simple moving violation doesn't disqualify you. A carry license is all but impossible to get, that's a privilege reserved for the rich and famous.

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  • Rudy saved NY

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