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News: U.S. Military Develops Self-Guided Bullets

With the ongoing advancements in modern technology it should come as no
surprise that military agencies, in this case the United States
military, are seeking to apply new technologies to the battlefield.
Since a warzone can be a hellish place where one mistake can mean
jeopardizing the life of a fellow soldier or even your own, soldiers
learn quickly that they must always be alert and on guard.

Often placed under extreme conditions, soldiers must rely on unbridled
discipline, a great degree of patience, and of course a skilled level of
marksmanship. But thanks to new government research by Sandia National
Laboratories, American troops might be getting some much appreciated
help in the form of self-guided bullets.

Sandia National Laboratories
has long been at work with the United States military developing the
ultimate “smart bullet.” It announced today that a successful prototype
of the bullet was created and tested at distances of over a mile (about
2,000 meters).

“We have a very promising technology to guide small projectiles that
could be fully developed inexpensively and rapidly,” said Sandia
researcher Red Jones. Sandia’s new technology features a dart-like
“smart bullet” that allows for unprecedented movement while in flight.

Working in tandem with laser designators, each bullet measures around
four inches in length. An optical sensor can be seen at the tip of the
round, which can detect a laser beam that would be used to “paint” a
target. Inside, the bullets are able to communicate with the different
sensors that are gathered via sensors which also communicate with the
bullet allowing it to steer and maneuver to its destination.

Original story: Digital Trends

**NOTE**
This video depicts a working prototype.

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Added: Jan-30-2012 Occurred On: Jan-30-2012
By: Operator
In:
World News
Tags: news, military, america, usa, technology, gun, guns, bullet, bullets
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  • We also just took the Land warrior system to the next level. I will search for a vid.

    Posted Jan-31-2012 By 

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  • So it's like auto aim on games??????????

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  • Wow, that sure explained the technology in depth.

    Posted Jan-31-2012 By 

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  • ...

    Posted Jan-31-2012 By 

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  • Huh? How is this a "self guided bullet"?

    Posted Jan-31-2012 By 

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  • The bullets have an articulated joint at the rear that uses piezoelectric pulses to change the angular momentum. Like larger BOFORS systems, each shot can be "programmed" in the time it takes to chamber the rd. (instantly)

    Posted Jan-31-2012 By 

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  • It's good for zombies.

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  • They'll be 100 ways to mess this technology up.

    Posted Jan-31-2012 By 

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  • impossible.

    Posted Jan-31-2012 By 

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    • @weadone Wrong.

      Posted Feb-1-2012 By 

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    • @ST0N3PONY how long will the round take to do a mile. and you believe it can be guided onto target.......nope bud can't see it

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    • @weadone It's old and proven technology. And the round wouldn't take any longer than they do to go a mile already. It's not sci-fi, you can go read about it.

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    • @ST0N3PONY i certainly will thanks but i still have doubts about it.

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    • @weadone It's been explored for years and years in various different methods. Excalibur would probably be the first successful example. GPS guided artillery rounds that could hit a man from 25 miles away. The major engineering problem is designing electronics that can withstand the g-forces of being fired. Once they worked it out though, it's simply been a matter of shrinking it down to something that will fit on smaller projectiles.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmAzAmYv364&feature=relate More..

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  • Comment of user 'Eva_Destruction' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
    • @Eva_Destruction It is real. The technology has been in the works for a long time. You're looking at it the wrong way. They're not intended for rapid-fire close quarters battle.

      It's for sniping. Larger heavier calibers at longer distances. In that context the technology is extremely practical. It could completely change sniping which is a complex two-person job involving computers and calculus. etc. etc.

      A guided bullet takes all the guess work out. All the drop and windage calculations. Hell More..

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    • @Eva_Destruction This bullet takes the skill out of sniping. Anyone will be able to get 2,000m kills. This bullet is a game changer, like what the crossbow did to the long bow. You could give anyone a crossbow and have them be efficient within a few tries, but bows take months/year to become proficient.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longest_recorded_sniper_kills

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    • Comment of user 'Eva_Destruction' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
    • @Eva_Destruction I looked it up. It's true actually. It's called the Coriolis Effect. Because the Earth is spinning at something like 1,000mph at the equator, that rotation can translate in to a difference of several inches at just a thousand yards. So, even if there's no wind at all, at the longer ranges of sniping, a shot can drift a foot or two to the left or right. Snipers today have to do a lot of complex math to account for that. Along with wind, and elevation, and drop, and humidity, and More..

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    • Comment of user 'Eva_Destruction' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!