Humanitarian aid for Pervomaysk

T<span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";
mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-ansi-language:EN" lang="EN">ranslated from a report by Evdokiya Sheremet’eva at littlehirosima.livejournal.com/46628.html

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From the translator:

This is a post explaining how the author and some people she didn’t know talked
about the suffering war brings, then collected aid and drove it to
the war-torn Donbass, and about what they saw there.

That was about five weeks ago. Since then, they have made two more trips, and
are gearing for the fourth.

Two previous reports by her (from the third trip, after she went to Pervomaysk in person) can be found here:

- www.liveleak.com/view?i=9c0_1422749474
- www.liveleak.com/view?i=254_1422661442

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Evdokiya:

I<span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";
mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-ansi-language:EN" lang="EN"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";
mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-ansi-language:EN" lang="EN"> spent a while thinking – what do I write in the report on how we spent the donated money and what happened to the humanitarian aid to Pervomaysk over previous weekend?

Honestly, after I put up a post saying, “let’s do everything ourselves”, I was somewhat
lost, because I could not understand what to do. What to take? How to deliver
it? Who will drive? What to do first? And how?

And there was a ringing silence. I almost gave up. Why did I decide to do this?

Suddenly Sasha wrote:

- Dunya, I will rent a car, let’s deliver this.

He did it so simply, without questions or doubts. We never met in person before.
Only online. He simply stepped up and offered.

- Let’s do it?

- Let’s do it!

And it was not important how much we’ll collect and of what. Even if this would
be just what we could buy and deliver ourselves. Even if we only help three
people, it will be the right thing to do.

And then came Lesha – “Dunya, let's coordinate? I have friends who can help”.
And then my friends began to write, and the whole thing took off. As departure
was drawing closer, I was being peppered by messages from people who did not
know me at all. I got offers of help, contact phones and introductions, bank
transfers, money handed over in person – all by complete strangers.

People came at night with bags full of canned meat and pasta. Caught me during
the day in the subway with bags of diapers and baby food. My mom was taking aid
packages, and our apartment turned into a humanitarian warehouse.



In less than five days we collected about 100 000 rubles (~$2000).

<span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";
mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"">We used the<span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";mso-fareast-font-family:
"Times New Roman";mso-ansi-language:EN" lang="EN"> money to purchase food and urgently needed hygiene products. Also part of the money went to fueling the car; unfortunately I can not find receipts for it. But believe me, Sasha spent a lot more of his money on gasoline and car rental.<span style="font-size:
12.0pt;font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"">
<span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:
"Times New Roman","serif";mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-ansi-language:
RU" lang="RU"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";
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I got money from France and Italy. From Mariupol and Rostov.

And even several transfers from Kiev, which was especially valuable to me:
“Dunya, we may have different [political] views, but this is the right thing to
do - people need help.” Sveta, my friend - went with me to Ashan [supermarket],
packing boxes with bandages and hygiene pads, got up at 6 am and helped load up
the car.



Sasha stoically drove from Moscow to Lugansk and back, by himself. Of course, with
my endless chatter, but still.

Sasha, Sasha. When I was crying in the car after we gave a lift to a 6-year-old
girl and her mother, who no longer have a home, he cheered me up. And then he
simply said:

- We will go again, we need to.



And all those who brought food, called, wrote…

Guys! Thank You!

But bigger thanks still to Zhenya and Lena. The guys drove to the border at
night to meet us. Drove us all over the place - to the airport, to the bombed villages.
We gave them everything we gathered, and went back to Moscow, and left the
hardest part to them.

I bow to them.



They went to the frontlines. To the town of Pervomaysk, which exists without
help for almost half a year.

To the town where shelling is always a threat, even during the truce. And
before the armistice, heavy artillery bombardment was constant. People could
not even come out from the cellars. 70 percent of the buildings are in ruins by
now.

And I'm very sorry that I did not go with Zhenya and Lena.



The problem of distribution of food rose immediately - if you give to people on
the spot, many people end up not getting any. Therefore, it was decided to
divide the food among social canteens. The canteens feed people for free.

The girls in the photos are not just kids, but cooks, servers and dishwashers. They
work together with adults.

Zhenya wrote in the evening: "Can you imagine, when we began to unload we
first brought out the millet; the cooking girls were like:" Wow! We’ll
make some porridge! "And then they saw vegetable oil... I'm not even
talking about the condensed milk and canned beef, they literally froze."



"<span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";
mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"">There was HAPPINESS in their eyes.
You see they are so GLAD that someone brought food for the people… And when
they found out it’s from common people, not from an organization, everyone just
started crying."

<span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";
mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-ansi-language:EN" lang="EN">Do you understand?

With tears in their eyes (video, 1.01 and after)…





Since we had a lot of children’s things in addition to food, the guys delivered them to children around town.

To be honest, I’m terribly embarrassed for the "Thank Dunya, thanks people"
sign, but Eugene and Lena decided that it would show that all the aid reached
the destination.

The children in the photograph live in a basement (the last picture in the
post), which currently houses 30 people total.



All the formula and children’s things were distributed to mums individually.

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Many in Pervomaisk live like that - in basements, as groups of people.



In fact, Zhenya sent a lot of pictures.

But most importantly, I want to say that people continue to write with proposals
of help.

And we're going again this weekend! We gathered another van of food, children's
goods and things.

And we will probably go again!

This has been some crazy miracle. Thanks to everyone who trusted me.

Thanks to everyone who transferred money, who brought food and clothes. Who
wrote with words of encouragement. Sasha, Sveta, Alex, Zhenya, Lena - the
realization that there are people like you helps me to think that in the end,
everything will be fine!

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