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Somali's come to US to finance their domestic islamic jihad, sending money home.

Many recent and sparsely reported incidents of cars full of somali men stopped by police, cavorting around the country for no apparent reason, far from their original homes. Thx Bill Clinton..
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...Even in small CO farming towns:

"Refugee 101: Somalis, Iraqis will not swamp Morgan County
By DAN BARKER, Times Staff Writer

Click photo to enlarge (Editor's note - This is the first of two parts of a story about how refugees ended up in Fort Morgan and the challenges the community and the refugees face.)
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By DAN BARKER
Times Staff Writer
A rumor that 1,000 Somali refugees and 1,000 Iraqi refugees would descend on Fort Morgan is not true.
In fact, less than 1 percent of the estimated 11 million refugees worldwide find new homes in other countries each year, said James Horan, refugee division director for Lutheran Family Services, during a forum called Refugee 101 at Morgan Community College on Tuesday morning.
When they are selected for resettlement in the U.S., they go to major cities which are chosen for the ability to house them and offer services, he said to a crowd of representatives from local agencies.
Once a refugee comes to the country, however, he or she has the same right to relocate as anyone else, Horan said.
A major focus for organizations like LFS is to make sure refugees find jobs, although it was the Somalis' own idea to come to Fort Morgan to work at the Cargill Meat Solutions beef plant because it is relatively high-paying for unskilled labor, he said.
One of the reasons for the forum was to educate people on the culture and situation of Somalis and other Africans who are in Fort Morgan, said Brenda Zion, coordinator of OneMorgan County.
"I really encourage you to ask tough questions," she urged the audience, saying they could write anonymous questions she would present if they were uncomfortable.
Fort Morgan and Greeley are in a unique situation, Horan said. In general, refugees are in controlled settings where they have support, like in Denver. It can be a lot tougher when refugees show up without those kinds of support systems, which has meant that Fort Morgan had to react rather than be prepared, Horan said.
Nonetheless, Morgan County has been open, welcoming and willing to work to receive the newcomers - a fact Horan cites to other communities he works with, he said.
Horan does work in Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska and Montana, he said.
At first, young single Somali men and married men without their families came to work at Cargill. Later, the families followed, which shows they like the community, Horan said.
Many Somalis were agricultural residents in their homeland who might find it more difficult to live in an urban setting. Places like Fort Morgan probably feel more like home, he said.
In addition, the Cargill job allows them to walk to work and does not take a lot of English, said Abdullahi Aden, a case manager for LFS and a refugee who moved to Fort Morgan himself.
Horan said about 250 refugees now live in Fort Morgan, mostly Somalis, with some Congolese, Sudanese and Ethiopians.
Aden said the Somalis have a makeshift mosque in town for their religious needs.
Police
Racial tensions have surfaced in Fort Morgan recently - some people in the weekend car show used racial epithets, with a bad reaction from the targets - but that was not with the Somalis, said Fort Morgan Police Chief Keith Kuretich.
Those young black men were from Atlanta, Ga., he said.
However, there are people in the community who do not accept the refugees, Kuretich said.
That puts the Fort Morgan Police Department in the difficult position of trying to enforce laws without picking on people because of race or ethnicity while receiving complaints, he said.
The most common complaint is the way Somalis drive. Some calls are about parking issues. Some instances of assault and abuse of alcohol have occurred among the younger men, but no serious criminal violations, Kuretich said.
Some longtime residents feel a bit intimidated by the visible presence of numbers of Somalis who live in concentrated areas like apartment buildings. he said. Sometimes Somalis tend to loiter around the areas and that causes concern, he said.
Other times, it is just a case of "I should be able to park in front of my own home," from people who object to Somalis parking on the street around crowded apartments, Kuretich said.
The incident last weekend did not result in any injuries or arrests, but at some point the police will have to handle such situations if people are harassing others, he said.
In the meantime, Kuretich said he would like to keep the lines of communication open and called on agencies to educate county citizens. He also said there is still a lot residents do not understand about their new neighbors.
Much of this is just the strife and pain any community feels when a community goes through change, Kuretich said.
Kuretich said he wished Somalis and others had a longer period of cultural orientation before they moved into the area.
Horan said he agreed and would mention the idea of expanded cultural orientation to Colorado's refugee coordinator, especially for those moving into a rural community. The coordinator has realized that the map of refugees around the state is much more complex than originally envisioned.
Ungrateful
One man asked how Somalis can expect those who are hosting them to change their ways instead of the Somalis changing.
He was talking about the much-publicized conflict at the Swift & Co. meat plant in Greeley, where Somalis walked off the job over religious issues.
That particular problem has not affected Fort Morgan,Horan said. There are differences among workplaces, as there are differences among workers, and a middle ground was found in Fort Morgan, he said.
"Integration is a two-way street," he said, meaning refugees need to be willing to make accommodations as well as employers do.
"It's not all about the receiving community (making allowances); it's not all on the refugees," he said.
Some refugees may not embrace that fact yet, Horan said.
"You're in a very challenging period," he said.
Aden said the people he knows are working to put together a group to work on issues, but he cautioned people to remember that not all black people in town are Somali.
Schools
Don Coloroso, program coordinator for Centennial BOCES, said the community has reached out to the Somalis and other refugees, but wanted to know if there were resources for helping schools cope.
That is a real problem, Aden said, because many parents do not speak English, which makes it hard for them to help with homework.
"It's really hard with so many kids," said one Pioneer Elementary School teacher.
She often has Aden's help, because one of his children is in her class, but it would help if there were some interpreter for the school district, she said.
Not only does the inability to communicate frustrate teachers, it frustrates the parents, too, the teacher said.
Those interpreters that are in town are very busy with the numerous agencies that need them, Coloroso said.
A school district official said getting funding is hard, because it is based on kids and the student-teacher ratio. Assistant Superintendent Joy Perry said there is not a particular number threshold for finding interpreters, though.
She did say the district simply has to have communication for certain things like district letters and parent-teacher conferences.
It is particularly difficult if a parent is illiterate in his or her own language, since he or she cannot even read a Somali version, Perry said.
This is a challenge in Denver, too, Horan said, although there was a person who could serve as a shared interpretive resource among different agencies.
Coloroso called on the other agencies at the forum to perhaps pool funding to pay for a full-time interpreter.
Perry also said the school district may need to do professional development classes for teachers who have Somali students.
Health
One thing East Morgan County Hospital does is use a "language line," which offers translation with a telephone call, said a nurse from the hospital.
She wondered if a specific forum could be held for health providers to help them understand how to serve the refugees, understanding their customs and special needs.
That brought up the issue of how Somali refugees seem to be getting more help as immigrants than other ethnic groups, especially in the past.
"Nobody helped my grandparents," seems to be the refrain, several noted.
Horan said his grandfather came from the former Yugoslavia. He depended on the community of Yugoslavians to help him adapt to the U.S.
As each wave of immigrants has come, the outreach has been different, he said.
"This is the American story," Horan said.
In this case, refugees may be getting more help because there is a formal federal program, but it is not always easy. For instance, refugee resettlement was completely shut down after the events of 9/11, which did not happen to other immigrants, he said.
"I think we are in unique times as a country," Horan said."
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(Friday: The next story examines how Somalis and other refugees come to the U.S. and why America makes this commitment.)
- Contact Dan Barker at business@fmtimes.com.
Interesting that there are no comments here yet.There will be a sizable number of refugees settled here,that's the way it works.You have a packing house,an advocate's office or two,and representatives of refugee agencies showing up-telling the community how wonderful this prograam is.This is the same way it worked here in Emporia,KS.The resettlement agencies eventually labeled Emporia as"unwelcoming". More info on this 900 million dollar a year program here-
http://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/2008/09/26/some-ft-morgan-residents-uneasy-about-somalis-flocking-to-town/



http://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/2008/09/26/some-ft-morgan-residents-uneasy-about-somalis-flocking-to-town/

Some Ft. Morgan residents uneasy about Somalis flocking to town
Posted by acorcoran on September 26, 2008

Additional Update: See our lead story today about Somali gang murders in Minneapolis here.

Update September 27th: Part II of this story at the Fort Morgan Times about Somalis in that Colorado town is simply a recitation of refugee resettlement agency spin. However, it ends with the following lines. The Somalis have given Ft. Morgan a thumbs up:

Agencies receive feedback from Somalis and other refugees and federal monitors review it in order to make sure they are self-sufficient, Stein said.

Most of the feedback about Fort Morgan has been positive, he said.

“Fort Morgan has done a lot of good work,” Stein said. [More Somalis will soon be on the way. Did you know that Lewiston, ME has around 7000?]



Here we go again! Another American city struggling with the flow of refugees to their neighborhoods. This article, thanks to Blulitespecial for sending it, could be from Emporia, KS, Shelbyville, TN, Fort Wayne, IN, Grand Island, NE, nearby Greeley, CO, or even our county seat Hagerstown, MD.

There is so much in this article that this will be a long dissection, and I won’t even scratch the surface so read it all here.

There was a forum this week in Ft. Morgan, CO to discuss rumors about refugees coming to town in a big way. The article begins jokingly:

A rumor that 1,000 Somali refugees and 1,000 Iraqi refugees would descend on Fort Morgan is not true.

This tone, probably used by the advocates of resettlement, is to tell the reader that even by suggesting such large numbers those doing it are alarmists and nuts.

I am here to tell you that is not a joke! You will have thousands of refugees in the next few years unless the residents of Ft. Morgan and the elected leadership in that city say right now they want it stopped or controlled. You, the citizens and elected officials can decide how much you can handle. There are over 5000 refugees in Ft. Wayne, IN because that city never said NO! We first heard about Ft. Wayne last September because the health department couldn’t handle the large numbers of refugees with HIV, TB and other health problems.

This is not true!

When they are selected for resettlement in the U.S., they go to major cities which are chosen for the ability to house them and offer services, he said to a crowd of representatives from local agencies.

The large gateway cities do still get some refugees, but there is a concerted effort by the US State Department and the volags (supposedly voluntary organizations) contracted to resettle refugees to get them spread across America. What the volags do is sit around a table in Washington and pick cities, literally in a hit or miss fashion, looking for “welcoming” cities that offer low-skilled employment opportunities. They bring in a couple hundred refugees quietly and see how the city reacts.

In our Maryland county, the residents demanded to know what was going on. A year ago in September, we had a “forum” for the whole community and the State Department representatives and the volags did not answer peoples’ questions adequately, citizens were still angry, and the resettlement was shut down within two weeks after the forum.

Then this statement requires a response:

It can be a lot tougher when refugees show up without those kinds of support systems, which has meant that Fort Morgan had to react rather than be prepared, Horan [director Lutheran Family Services] said.

Yes, we can’t control where people go when they get to America. These resettlement agencies don’t even have to know where anyone they resettle is after only three months. However, in the case of Greeley and Ft. Morgan, the federal government knew in advance that they were going to be resettling more refugees in this part of Colorado to supply Cargill and Swift with meatpacking labor. Incidentally, some of the flow to Ft. Morgan now is the Somalis fired in Greeley.

I first discussed this back in July of 2007. Here is the article from the Greeley Tribune announcing the arrival of the Lutheran Family Services office. They shouldn’t have been “unprepared” because someone at the state level and at the federal level knew it (the flood of refugees) was coming because the federal government funded the volag (Lutheran Family Services) office which opened last summer. Here is more of what I said about the collusion between the meatpackers and the feds.

Then this outfit, One Morgan County, funded by the Colorado taxpayer, has been in the soup for awhile:

One of the reasons for the forum was to educate people on the culture and situation of Somalis and other Africans who are in Fort Morgan, said Brenda Zion, coordinator of OneMorgan County.

I wrote about a meeting they had this past August with federal officials from the Office of Refugee Resettlement who came to Ft. Morgan to mediate, and it sure sounded like problems were brewing.

Below is the sort of thing the volags promoting more refugees will say to guilt-trip other cities. If the city should balk, then the residents are labelled “unwelcoming.” My city of Hagerstown, MD was labelled “unwelcoming” as the Virginia Council of Churches packed up and left. Emporia, KS where Tyson’s closed its plant and moved its Somalis elsewhere, is also an “unwelcoming” city.

If you are a “welcoming” city you will be used to guilt-trip other cities.

Nonetheless, Morgan County has been open, welcoming and willing to work to receive the newcomers — a fact Horan cites to other communities he works with, he said.

This is turning into an opus. Bottomline, the citizens of Ft. Morgan can make the decision about more refugees or not. But, if you decide to let the federal government send more to your “Mayberry like streets” at least know what you are getting into.

Learn about Shelbyville, TN, Emporia, KS, Ft. Wayne, IN, Greeley, CO and Grand Island, NE and go into this with eyes wide open. Bt the way, in Grand Island violence is on the rise between the Somalis and the Sudanese refugees in that city.

Just one more thing. The reason you are not hearing about these on-going refugee hot spots in the mainstream media is that they don’t want Americans to know that everything in their multicultural dream world is not going so beautifully.

There are a few media bright spots however in the smaller papers. In Tennessee, reporter Brian Mosely, won his state’s top investigative reporting prize for his series on Somali refugees in Shelbyville, TN and the struggle the citizens there are having.

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http://www.jihadwatch.org/2009/10/fbi-arrests-somali-man-implicated-in-transfer-of-jihadists-from-us-to-somalia.html

FBI arrests Somali man implicated in transfer of jihadists from U.S. to Somalia
"U.S. intelligence officials have been following the case out of concern that the Somalis leaving Minneapolis are being funneled to al-Shabab through what might be America's first jihadi pipeline."

More on this story. Of additional concern is what these jihadists may do if they make it back from Somalia. "FBI Makes Another Arrest In Missing Somalis Case," by Dina Temple-Raston for NPR, October 10:

The FBI has made another arrest in its yearlong investigation into a rash of disappearances from the Somali community in Minnesota.
A 26-year-old medical technician from St. Paul was arrested on Friday and charged with making false statements to FBI officials. His arrest had been under seal until Tuesday, when he appeared in a St. Paul federal court.
An FBI spokesman said that Abdow Abdow's arrest was related to the ongoing investigation into the two dozen Somali youths who have left the United States and traveled to Somalia to join a militia there called al-Shabab.
The criminal complaint against Abdow says he lied about driving a handful of Somali-Americans from Minneapolis across the country on Oct. 6. One of the young men in the car had his passport and $4,000 in cash. Two other young men who were passengers in Abdow's car tried to leave the United States through Mexico two days later.
When Abdow was asked about his fellow travelers, he denied they were in the car, the FBI says. When interviewed at work, Abdow allegedly told the FBI, "I'm talking too much." Then, when he finally admitted having a handful of passengers in his car, he added, "Whatever those guys are into, I'm not."
The FBI would not say whether the men in the car were among those under investigation or whether they intended to travel to Somalia.
U.S. intelligence officials have been following the case out of concern that the Somalis leaving Minneapolis are being funneled to al-Shabab through what might be America's first jihadi pipeline. Think of the potential pipeline as an underground railroad for jihadists -- an intricate but informal network of militants who help their brothers in arms not only travel to terrorist training camps but also return home. The return trip to America is what worries U.S. intelligence. They envision a raft of young men training for jihad and slipping back into the U.S. to launch an attack.
Al-Shabab, a militia group with links to al-Qaida, is on the State Department's list of terrorist organizations. For almost two years, it has been recruiting young Somali men from cities such as Minneapolis, Cleveland, Boston and San Diego, putting them on the front lines of Somalia's civil war. One of those recruits, a young Minneapolis man named Shirwa Ahmed, blew himself up in a suicide bombing last October. Two of the men who were traveling with Abdow earlier this month stopped at the U.S. border not far from San Diego.
One agent says this has been one of the biggest domestic terrorism investigations in this country since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. So far, five of the young Minnesotans who have traveled to Somalia and joined al-Shabab have been killed in the fighting there.


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Added: Jan-12-2010 
By: HydrogenEconomy
In:
Iraq, News
Tags: somali, jihad, USA
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