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low pass avro LANCASTER

The Avro Lancaster is a British four-engined Second World War heavy bomber designed and built by Avro for the Royal Air Force (RAF). It first saw active service with RAF Bomber Command in 1942 and, as the strategic bombing offensive over Europe gathered momentum, it became the main heavy bomber used by the RAF, the RCAF, and squadrons from other Commonwealth and European countries serving within the RAF







Remembrance of the Dead (Dutch: Dodenherdenking) is held annually on May 4 in the Netherlands. It commemorates all civilians and members of the armed forces of the Kingdom of the Netherlands who have died in wars or peacekeeping missions since the outbreak of World War II.



In the Netherlands, Liberation Day (Dutch Bevrijdingsdag) is celebrated each year on May 5th, to mark the end of the occupation by Nazi Germany during World War II



The nation was liberated largely by Canadian troops, with the assistance of the British and American Armies

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Added: May-4-2012 
By: NECKSHOT
In:
Other Entertainment, Weapons
Tags: warplanes, ww2, tribute
Views: 2139 | Comments: 31 | Votes: 5 | Favorites: 2 | Shared: 5 | Updates: 0 | Times used in channels: 2
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  • HELL yeah. Nice post. Great plane from an even greater country.

    Thank you!

    Posted May-4-2012 By 

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  • i just love those old birds, something majestic about them

    Posted May-4-2012 By 

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  • Love the sound of those Merlins. Sounds like a flight of Mustangs in formation!

    Posted May-4-2012 By 

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  • Comment of user 'RugOutFromUnderYou' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
  • my grandad was the navigator in one of these beasts in ww2 and his brother was a spitfire pilot. so many lancasters got shot down by the germans on the bombing runs, im probably lucky to be here really!

    very proud :)

    p.s. i get the last remaining original lancaster fly over my house sometimes flanked by 2 spitfires. its very very cool to see, and the noise they make is so fucking awesome :)

    Posted May-4-2012 By 

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    • @jimps86 Awesome. Respect to your Grandfather. My father was a pilot of a B-17. He was based at the Ridgewell Airfield until he was shot down over Schweinfurt in '43. He was fortunate to survive as well. P.O.W. for 18 months. He had nothing but respect for the Brit flyers who shared the base. At the time, the Brits were flying the Stirlings from there as well as the Yanks and their B-17s.

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    • @migs1955 I can't imagine what it was like to fly in bombers and get attacked by fighters. Especially knowing the odds of getting shot down. Respect to your family fighting.

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    • @Mrakulous Yeah, the Schweinfurt raid cost 60 B-17s that day. 60 bombers lost in one raid. Damn. My father was lucky to be able to bail out before his plane exploded. Half his crew didn't make it. Thanks for your comments

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    • @jimps86
      you should be very proud ,we have so much to thank to these brave men in ww2,which liberate our country,on behalf of the people of holland,i would like to thank him and to all heroes. . . I SALUTE.

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    • @migs1955


      you should be very proud ,we have so much to thank to these brave men in ww2,which liberate our country,on behalf of the people of holland,i would like to thank him and to all heroes. . . I SALUTE

      Posted May-5-2012 By 

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  • I wonder how much longer they can be kept flying?

    The question I'd ask is what is the minimum number of hours they need to fly every year in order to be able to fly every year?

    You can't fly 'em all the time, and leaving them on the shelf for years does them no good either.

    So what's the optimal flying hours per year? :-)

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  • Nice toy.

    Posted May-4-2012 By 

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  • Classic

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  • I'm lucky, i get to see this all the time. 1 of the last 2 remaining flies around Hamilton often!

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  • Not a very large payload; our medium bombers were not much smaller than the British "heavies". And it is an ugly duck. If you want a sexy British plane that dropped bombs, try the DeHaviland Mosquito. Fast as hell, made of plywood, and unarmed, depending on speed. Very beautiful airframe. Very nice plane. Used to pretty good effect, too. I have ridden in a Lancaster and much prefer our Liberator. But I am biased. The Liberator was also an ugly bird, but it had the largest payload and r More..

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    • @Unregistered Visitor What gives you the impression the Lancaster didn't have a "very large payload"? Normal bombload was 14.000 lb (6.3t], the B17 and B24 carried 8.000 lb (3.6t) max (on shortrange missions!). So the Lancaster carried double of that U.S. bombers carried.

      The B24 definitely didn't have the largest payload of all bombers in the European theatre. The Lancaster, in a specially modified version, was even able to carry the "Grand Slam", 22.000 lb.

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    • @Uac_mitun_ahau Ah, you got me on that one. I was thinking of the payload of the Manchester. The Lancaster did indeed carry more bombs, albeit lower, slower, and less accurately. Your turn.

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    • @Unregistered Visitor Your comparing apples and pears. The Lancaster was optimised for night bombing: less armor, fewer guns of a smaller calibre. The B17 didn't have its name "Flying Fortress" for nothing: the concept of heavily armored, heavily armed bombers that could fight their way through the fighter defences of the enemy was behind that - and failed (Schweinfurt). Only the advance of long range escort fighter (P47, P38, best of all: the P51) made daylight bombing possible again. More..

      Posted May-6-2012 By 

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    • @Unregistered Visitor By 1945 the RAF were bombing more accurately at night, than the USAAF was during the day. (Read that only yesterday in a book written by an American historian)and granted it took a long time and a lot of lives to learn how to.

      Posted May-10-2012 By 

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  • Comment of user 'Hazel_Nut' has been deleted by author (after account deletion)!
  • Low pass of an airplane near an air-field. now that's a first!

    Posted May-4-2012 By 

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