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A LONE Gurkha has fought off the Taliban in a Rambo-style hail of fire.

Firepower … Sgt Dip held 30lb gun and let fly 750 rounds a minute
He is believed to have killed three and wounded several others with the gun – weighing well over 30lb and hammering out 750 rounds a minute.
A source said: “It would have taken a superhuman effort to hold the gun and fire it. Apart from its weight, the recoil is colossal.”
Firefight … he held off a dozen Taliban from rooftop, killing at least 3
The 15-minute stand came after Sgt Dip, 31, was left at a checkpoint in Nahr-e Saraj, Helmand.
Spotting a Taliban attack, he ran on to a roof to man a 7.62mm general purpose machine gun mounted on a tripod.
As the insurgents came over the wall Sgt Dip realised he could not lower the gun enough to hit them. So he yanked out the pins locking it down – CHUCKING the heavy tripod at the enemy – and lifted it up.
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Click to view image: 'Gurkha - Sgt. Dipprasad Pun'

Heroic ... Sgt Dipprasad Pun beat off attackers.
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The British Army's Gurkhas are, according to many, the bravest and most fearsome soldiers on the planet.
This has been proved again with one Gurkha fighting off a dozen Taliban in Afghanistan with a Rambo-style hail of fire.
Sergeant Dipprasad Pun hoisted a giant machine gun - weighing 30lb - off its mount and held it as he blazed away at them, killing three and wounding several others.
He also beat off the attackers with grenades and an SA80 rifle before reinforcements arrived.
Sgt Dip, of 1st Battalion the Royal Gurkha Rifles, would not speak about the September 17 battle. And it is too early to speculate if he will win a medal as citations have not been written. But Army spokesman Lt Col David Eastman said: "He is a credit to his unit."
The Gurkhas, one of Britain's greatest allies, are Nepalese and have been fighting in the British Army since 1817. They are famous for their traditional Nepalese kukri knives, lethal weapons with curved blades that every Gurkha in the British Army is issued with and trained in their use. They are used as close combat weapons. According to legend, a Gurkha "never sheathes his blade without first drawing blood."

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Over the years they have won 26 Victoria Crosses.
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Heroes' proud medal history
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♣ ♣ ♣ THE Gurkhas have a distinguished history of Victoria Cross winners.
♣ ♣ ♣ Rifleman Lachhiman Gurung took on 200 Japanese troops while manning a forward post in Burma (then a part of the British Empire) in May 1945.
During the battle, which left him blinded, he threw two grenades back at the enemy - but a third detonated, blowing off his arm.
Lachhiman, now 92, continued to fire his rifle with his good arm for four hours, killing at least 30 Japs. He retired on disability grounds in 1946 and is wheelchair-bound in Hounslow, West London.
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♣ ♣ ♣ Rifleman Tul Bahadur Pun, 21, led a lone charge against a Japanese machine gun nest after his comrades were slaughtered in Burma in June 1944.
He killed three enemy soldiers and chased off five others.
Now 87, he then used two captured machine guns and ammunition to provide cover for his platoon following behind.

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A LOOK BACK AT THE GURKHAS FEROCIOUS GALLANTRY!
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20th July 2010 - As a Gurkha is disciplined for beheading a Taliban: Thank God they are on our side!
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A British Army Gurkha sergeant was told his men would be jumping into enemy territory. He returned next day to say the men would rather jump from below 500ft on to marshy ground. 'But your parachutes won't open,' said the Colonel. 'Ah,' said the sergeant. 'No one mentioned parachutes.'
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Gurkhas have been fighting for the British for 200 years. There are currently around 4000 of them serving in the British Army. The major units of the Brigade of Gurkhas today are The Royal Gurkha Rifles (two battalions), The Queen's Gurkha Engineers, Queen's Gurkha Signals, and The Queen's Own Gurkha Logistic Regiment. In addition there are two independent companies - Gurkha Company (Sittang) at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and Gurkha Company (Mandalay) at the Infantry Battle School, Brecon.
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Just picture the scene as a soldier returns from hunting an arch-enemy. Commanding officer: 'Did you get him?' Soldier: 'Yes, sir.' Commanding officer: 'Are you sure?'
Soldier: 'Yes, sir.' Soldier reaches into rucksack and places severed head on table.
Commanding officer: ' ****!' If it happened in a Hollywood movie, the audience would either laugh or applaud. But there was no laughter the other day when this happened for real in Babaji, Afghanistan, current posting for the 1st Battalion, Royal Gurkha Rifles.
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The precise circumstances will not be determined until an official report has been completed, but reliable military sources have confirmed that a Gurkha patrol was sent out with orders to track down a Taliban warlord described as a 'high-value target'.
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Click to view image: 'Gurkhas Kukri Knife'

Kukri lessons: British Army Gurkhas display their traditional weapon of choice, which has been used by the Nepalese for centuries. Unfortunately for the Taliban and other enemies of the British Army, it is said that a Gurkha "never sheathes his blade without first drawing blood."
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Having identified their target, a fierce battle ensued during which the warlord was killed. To prove that they had got their man, the Gurkhas attempted to remove the body for identification. Further enemy fire necessitated a fast exit minus corpse. So, an unnamed soldier drew his kukri - the standard-issue Gurkha knife - removed the man's head and legged it.
Ten out of ten for initiative. Nought out of ten for diplomacy.
Nato forces are supposed to be winning 'hearts and minds' and bolstering the fledgling Afghan National Army. This incident, however, has apparently appalled Afghans on all sides, not least because it offends the Muslim tradition of burying the dead with all body parts, attached or unattached.
It transpires that the Gurkha soldier has been removed from operations and sent back to his barracks in Kent pending further investigations. Ministry of Defence sources have been quick to emphasise that the British Army is appalled by what has happened. According to one: 'There is no sense of glory involved, more a sense of shame. He should not have done what he did.'
I can already hear Ministers, diplomats and top brass echoing similar pieties. It is, of course, a gruesome business. All societies have taboos about desecrating the dead.
It's even in the Geneva Convention.
And away from Whitehall, among the broader Gurkha family, the general response which I encountered yesterday could be summed up as follows: 'What's all the fuss about?'
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Click to view image: 'Gurkhas Waiting To Board A Chinook'

Soldiers of the Royal Gurkha Rifles wait to board a Chinook helicopter in the forward operating base of Musa Qala. The helicopter was to take the Gurkhas back to Camp Bastion where they were to fly back to the UK at the end of their six-month tour in Afghanistan
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As one put it to me: 'This man was only doing what his grandfather and father would have done before him.'
'The Gurkhas are the ultimate professional soldiers,' says Major Gordon Corrigan, military historian and a Gurkha officer for 29 years. 'They are not brutal or bloodthirsty. They treat prisoners honourably. But if their CO says, "That is the enemy. Go and attack him", they will not flinch. And do not be surprised if their weapon of choice is the kukri. It is their sidearm. But they kill in hot blood - not cold.'
Having seen his former comrades decapitating cattle, goats and buffalos at a single stroke, he has no doubt that the Babaji episode would have been a swift and clinical affair.
At Winchester's Gurkha Museum, curator Major Gerald Davies points out that Gurkhas were positively encouraged to bring back evidence of enemy kills during World War II.
'The intelligence officers would want to see proof,' says the veteran of 33 years with the Gurkhas. 'The men started coming back with Japanese heads, but when that became unwieldy, they took to cutting off ears. It might sound appalling to society today, but that's what war was like in the jungle.'
Major Corrigan says the Gurkhas followed a similar policy during the Malayan Emergency. 'They were told to bring back terrorists' bodies for identification, but you could hardly carry one of those through heavy jungle so they would come back with heads,' he explains.
'Finally, someone had the bright idea of issuing them with cameras, although I'm not sure the results were up to much.'
The Gurkhas have had a formidable reputation in the West ever since the Anglo-Nepal War of 1814-16. Having failed to conquer them - which is why Nepal has never been part of either the British Empire or the Commonwealth - the British did the next best thing, which was to sign them up. Since then, they have proved exemplary comrades for two centuries.
Their success is, in part, down to sheer guts. But it also derives from their reputation. As they found - to their disappointment - in the Falklands War, their fame precedes them.
'By the time they arrived on Mount Tumbledown, the Argentinians had seen pictures of Gurkhas sharpening their kukris and read all these stories about them eating their prisoners,' says Major Corrigan. 'So when the Gurkhas actually appeared, all they found were empty trenches.'

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CREDITS:
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**JOHN KAY and DAVID WILLETTS - The Sun

**CANADIANCONTENT.NET/NEWS

**Daily Mail Newsgroup


Added: Nov-5-2010 Occurred On: Nov-3-2010
By: The_Dogs_Bollox
In:
Afghanistan, Middle East
Tags: gurkha, helmand, lt col david eastma, machine gun, nahr e saraj, rambo, royal gurkha rifles, sa80 rifle, sergeant dipprasad pun, taliban
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