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1st photos of Russian spies in Seattle/(WA gov.) Gregoire: "we're not Arizona"

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2012485850_spyphotos30m.html?syndication=rss

First photos released of Russian spies who lived in Seattle
The United States Marshals office on Thursday for the first time released photographs of the 10 people arrested as Russian spies in a nationwide sweep June 27. Two of the people, Natalia Pereverzeva, who lived under the assumed name Patricia Mills, and Mikhail Kutsik, who used the name Michael Zottoli, lived for a time on Seattle's Capitol Hill before moving to Virginia.

By Seattle Times staff

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Patricia Mills (Natalia Pereverzeva)


Michael Zottoli (Mikhail Kutsik)
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The United States Marshals office on Thursday for the first time released photographs of the 10 people arrested as Russian spies in a nationwide sweep June 27.

Two of the people, Natalia Pereverzeva, who lived under the assumed name Patricia Mills, and Mikhail Kutsik, who used the name Michael Zottoli, lived for a time on Seattle's Capitol Hill before moving to Virginia.

The couple posed as a married couple with two young children. They both pleaded guilty to conspiring to act as an unregistered agent of a foreign country and were deported to Russia earlier this month.

Kutsik worked at Premiere Global Services, a telecommunications firm, from 2007 to 2009. He earned a bachelor's degree in business administration from the University of Washington in 2006.

Pereverzeva also earned a bachelor's degree in business administration from the UW in 2006.

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http://www.seattlepi.com/connelly/424196_JOEL30.html?source=rss

Gregoire on Immigration: 'We are not Arizona'
By JOEL CONNELLY

Immigrant-bashing rouses mouth-breathers on talk radio and is lately a staple of the Republicans' political diet, with airwaves filled with references to "illegals" and "lawbreakers" plus even an off-the-wall claim that Phoenix is America's new murder capital.


Gov. Chris Gregoire, fresh from an Eastern Washington tour, has a different perspective on many of the undocumented workers who've helped build and sustain Washington's agricultural economy.


"They haven't been there a year or two," Gregoire said in an interview. "Some have been here for 20 years. Their children have grown up here, gone to school here, gone to college here.


"They are a vibrant part of the community, the church and so on. They are part of the community."


Gregoire has taken Sen. John McCain's advice and read Arizona's immigration law -- cover to cover. It is, she is convinced, both unconstitutional and unenforceable.


"We are not Arizona," said Gregoire, "although we understand Arizona's frustration."


But . . .


"From a law enforcement perspective, I don't see how you would be able to enforce this," the governor added. "You are sued if you don't do something -- that's part of the law. You are sued if you do something, because that bring's the charge of racial profiling."


Strident immigrant-bashing has not been part of Gregoire's hearings on how to restructure state government.


"It isn't there," she said. "What I heard is, 'We need immigration reform'."


Gregoire has endured more bad opinion polls than than any predecessor -- except, possibly Dixy Lee Ray -- of the past half-century.


Yet, she won a comfortable reelection victory over Dino Rossi in 2008 and continues to be a working politician. The governor held a $1,000 a person fund raiser at Wild Ginger on Thursday night.


"I haven't ruled out anything, I haven't decided anything," Gregoire said when asked about future plans.


What will be her role in the 2010 election? "Yes, there are some (legislators) who have asked for help," Gregoire said. The governor plans to quietly raise campaign money, and do do an event with 3rd District U.S. House candidate Denny Heck early next month.


"I will do whatever I can for Patty (Murray)," Gregoire added.

Gregoire is an outspoken defender and advocate of the Obama Administration's Stimulus program. She credits it with the fact that the Great Recession has not become another Great Depression.


"I was just at the national governors' meeting in Boston," she said. "I think the real consensus is that we avoided a deep, deep, deep recession or even a depression with Stimulus dollars.

"It is, of course, hard to prove what DIDN'T happen . . . the cuts we avoided in Medicaid, the teachers not laid off: We got $2 billion at Hanford for starters, because we were ready with the projects when the program was announced."

Gregoire bristled a reference from Dino Rossi, now running for the Senate, to "temporary government jobs" created by Stimulus dollars. Rossi has talked of taking billions of remaining Stimulus funds and using the money to pay down the federal deficit.

"The construction industry is 4 percent of our employment, but 8 percent of the state budget," Gregoire said. "We will come out (of the recession) or stay in largely on the strength the construction industry."

"We are in the largest construction cycle for transportation in state history. Those are not 'state' jobs, those are provate sector jobs. The people over at Hanford are not government employees, those are private sector (contractor) jobs."

As well, Gregoire is disdainful of politicians (e.g. John McCain) who were for immigration reform before they were against it.

"It seems rather than building a consensus and gathering votes, they (the U.S. Senate) are further apart," Gregoire said.

What should be the elements of comprehensive immigration reform. Gregoire listed three key elements. They are:

--Better control of the U.S.-Mexico border, in both directions. "People are coming into this country," Gregoire said. "What are we putting into that country? Drugs and guns.

--A program of "earned legalization" in which immigrants who want to stay will pay their taxes, pay fines for not being in the U.S. legally and learn the English language.

--An "approved visa program" in which workers come into the United States for a set period to do a job, and return to their home country when it is done.

After all, noted Gregoire, somebody has to do the work. She recently visited a large farm in Eastern Washington. It was "audited," which have supplanted the former practice of sudden raids. Undocumented workers left.

What did the farm do? "They have brought in 400 Jamaicans," Gregoire said.

The episode conveys a message, which Gregoire has conveyed to U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security (and former Arizona Gov.) Janet Napolitano: "You need to understand Washington State. Our economy is somewhat dependent on these folks."

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http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/current_events/immigration/support_for_mexican_border_fence_up_to_68

Support for Mexican Border Fence Up to 68%
Thursday, July 29, 2010


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Added: Jul-30-2010 
By: HydrogenEconomy
In:
LiveLeaks
Tags: russian, spy, seattle, gregoire, arizona
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